Belfast northern ireland telephone directory

But maybe it's not. Bt Directory Residential. This Site Might Help You. Perfectly Safe. Go for it. Belfast and Northern Ireland has made huge improvements over the years. There are always trouble spots, like in every city. There were days when you wouldn't walk up certain streets as you'd know you were asking for it but that has almost all changed. Don't go through these areas at night but during the day no bother. As for Belfast city itself, it is just like any other city. The days of army patrolling the streets are long long gone.

You wont notice any difference from other cities now. I have tried to have conversations with people about religion in work places but you just get no answer. THe subject is not discussed among normal everyday people. Many not that many of the flash points these days are in co armagh and craigavon etc. Existing questions. Related Questions How safe is Belfast, Ireland? Do you know a free site for phone numbers in belfast Northern Ireland? Why do all phone numbers on TV or a Movie start with ?

More questions. Northern Ireland time zone? Specifically Belfast? Although numbers were banned in , even as late as there were NHS bodies only now just getting around to complying with that ban. In , the Advertising Standards Authority ASA started taking action against companies that falsely represent that " numbers are 'local rate' [ sic ] or 'lo-call' [ sic ] calls" or " numbers are 'national rate' [ sic ] calls".

After , several operators also offered 01, 02 and the newly created 03 numbers as "free minutes" within an "evening and weekend" calls bundle or within an "anytime" calls bundle. As a result of ever increasing mobile phone ownership, and especially the introduction of mobile broadband in the UK, the xx number range was opened in October In , the new number for non-emergency calls to the police began trials in several areas with a call cost of 10 pence per call. Calls now cost 15 pence per call from landlines and mobiles.

In February , Ofcom announced the 03 range of numbers was being brought into use [] and the first numbers were issued in May. Although allocated as non-geographic, these were to be charged at the same rate as geographic 01 and 02 numbers from both landline and mobile and were also to be included within "free minutes" bundles for subscribers with a call package.

Further details are in the 03 numbers section above. In May , Ofcom allocated the first numbers. These follow on from the earlier code which was now fully allocated. In November , the first numbers were allocated. These follow on from the earlier, and now fully allocated, code. These are used for revenue share services and are generally not included in bundled minutes from either mobiles or landlines. From landlines these numbers cost anything up to 20 pence per minute and from mobile phones anything up to 45 pence per minute. Due to continued misuse of the and number ranges, ICSTIS consulted on additional regulation in and announced in that both number ranges were to be regulated from After some delay they were eventually taken into the jurisdiction of PhonepayPlus [56] in In , a new area code was created for Ebbsfleet.

Adjacent area codes no longer had enough projected spare capacity for the new development to use, so was allocated. Ofcom had previously considered that personal numbers should migrate to 06, to replace the prefix that is sometimes confused with mobile phone numbers. Ofcom wanted and 06 numbers to have a price cap, and 07 numbers to be used exclusively for mobile phones.

Companies such as Hospedia formerly Patientline use personal numbers. After an in-depth study to better understand the market, Ofcom has changed its mind and is now proposing to drop the migration concept and decided that the forced migration to is no longer seen to be objectively justifiable. In , Ofcom introduced the first harmonised European numbers for harmonised services of social value, [] and additional numbers were allocated in As a result of ever increasing mobile phone and mobile broadband ownership, the xx number range was opened in July After a sustained period of abuse, revenue share was removed from [] and numbers.

Prices for calling numbers from landlines fell and some landline providers started to allow calls to numbers to appear within call-plan inclusive minutes. Revenue-share continued on , , , and numbers. It was anticipated that numbers would also lose their revenue share, leading BT to prematurely include these numbers within call plans. Ofcom changed their mind and the status of numbers wasn't changed.

Instead, in to , Ofcom eventually consulted on re-organisation of the whole of the and number ranges. After ICSTIS consultation in and [] numbers beginning and began to be regulated by PhonepayPlus, the premium rate services regulator from 1 August This brings regulation in line with existing 09xx premium rate services, personal numbers and xxx directory enquiries. It had been widely reported in that numbers were to be banned from the NHS. The accompanying letter introduced ambiguity: Organisations remain free to use non-geographical number ranges such as , providing that patients are not charged more than the equivalent cost of calling a geographical number to do so.

From this, it is clear that only 01, 02 and 03 numbers can be used by NHS bodies. Patients are billed by BT, Sky, Virgin, Vodafone, O2, Orange, T-Mobile, and others, and all of those charge more for calling numbers than for calling 01, 02 and 03 numbers. With widespread abuse of non-geographic numbers continuing unabated, Ofcom started a long series of consulatations in April Questions were asked in the Scottish Parliament in June A year after the GMS contract variation came into effect, many GPs were continuing to use numbers in defiance of the ban.

PCTs and GPs had failed to understand the revenue share mechanism as well as the price regulations that apply uniquely to BT and make their call rates atypical when compared to other providers. NEG continued to issue a revised version of their "letter of compliance", assuring GPs that calling numbers does not cost more than calling 01 and 02 numbers.

The BMA advised that GPs should not consider the price of calls for patients calling from landlines other than BT, nor those with inclusive allowances or using mobile phones. The directions are very clear that patients should not expect to be charged any more. PCTs Primary Care Trusts , en masse, had seemingly misunderstood the regulations or had been misled by the incorrect advice spread by NEG [] [] [] [] [] [] and the BMA [] as by November more than GPs were using the "banned" numbers.

Protests against the use of numbers were growing. Only a small number of GPs had complied with the ban. In January , a parliamentary debate took place [] [] where it was confirmed that users " should not pay more than a geographic rate call " and it was clarified that this applies to " both landlines and mobiles ". Additionally, " bundled " or " free minutes " should also count.

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A month later, the Department of Health issued further guidance on the use of numbers in the NHS confirming that GPs should consider " all means of telephoning the practice — including from payphones, mobile phones and landlines " [] [] [] [] which the BMA disputed. The Northern Ireland Assembly debated the issue in May [] [] where it was disclosed that 23 of Northern Ireland's GP surgeries use an number.

This covered some of the history relating to the issue. In order to comply, GPs should be using numbers that begin 01, 02 or 03 and should not be using numbers that begin , , or GPs using and numbers can migrate to the equivalent or version of their number without ending their phone service contracts. Only a few GPs and NHS services have chosen 03 numbers [] even though this should be the most obvious solution since 03 numbers allow the same call queueing and call management facilities as and numbers while costing the same as 01 and 02 numbers for all callers. In spite of the ban on numbers in the NHS since April , more GPs continue to sign up to use them [] [] [] [] [] [] [] [] [] however PhonepayPlus has also taken an interest in extending regulations that already cover 09 and numbers — as used for premium rate chat lines, competitions and phone-in voting systems — to also cover numbers.

Almost three years after the ban, some GPs within the constituencies of government ministers continue to use numbers. In , was introduced on a trial basis for non-urgent calls to the NHS. The scheme is planned to roll out nationally in and at that time may replace the currect NHS Direct 46 47 line in England and Wales and the NHS 24 24 24 24 line in Scotland. Extra capacity assigned in late , following consultation. In the other 01x1 area codes, only 8xx, 9xx, 9xx and 5xx have yet to be allocated.

In November , Ofcom proposed to abandon renumbering in areas running short of capacity and instead provide extra capacity by starting to use local numbers beginning '0' and '1', and removing the option of dialling locally using just the subscriber number. Once the supply of new numbers released by this measure is exhausted Ofcom propose introducing additional, overlay area codes to run in tandem with current codes. It is anticipated that the overlay codes would not be required before By way of an Erratum to the National Telephone Numbering Plan, [71] Ofcom started the lengthy process of correcting some very old errors for nine area code names in December Some of these errors first appeared in the version of the number plan [63] [66] [67] while others can also be found in older data originally produced by Oftel several years before.

As noted on Ofcom's site, the name changes still have to go through a formal consultation process, even though they are only correcting obvious spelling, hyphenation and capitalisation mistakes. In November , local dialling was removed for calls within the area allowing subscriber numbers beginning 0 or 1 to be issued locally and buying more time before an additional area code or code change is required. After initial consultation in and , in April Ofcom published the final consultation [] on proposals to re-arrange the , and non-geographic allocations in The range is to regain its revenue share status.

Where users of numbers cannot justify revenue share they are advised to move to their reserved matching number. The workings of the range will broadly align with how and revenue share numbers already work. Changes in how call costs for and non-geographic calls should in future be communicated to callers were announced. The callers phone line provider has to list a single Access Charge per tariff for the , , 09 and non-geographic number ranges and the called party has to display the single Service Charge or "premium" details for their non-geographic number.

Calls to the 'free to caller' range will be made free from mobile telephones, not just from landlines. Once the final announcements are made by Ofcom in the summer of , the changes will have an month transition period before coming into effect. In October certain area codes required the full area code even when dialing local numbers. The areas affected were:. The change was in response to a lack of free numbers in these areas.

By requiring the area code for all local calls, Ofcom are able to allocate numbers starting with 1 or 0. This increases the number of telephone numbers available without requiring a number change. On 1 July , Ofcom made a number of changes to the way phone calls to UK service numbers would be charged. The cost of calls made to service numbers is now split into two parts: Meanwhile, numbers remain chargeable as previously from mobiles free from landlines, also as previously.

Plans are afoot to migrate these to numbers in mid, whereupon they will become free from mobiles. Area codes for mobile phone, local rate, premium rate and other such special numbers originally used ordinary looking area codes in the 02xx to 09xx range. In the early s only a few such codes were in use. Rapid expansion of these services in the late s required many new codes, but there were a diminishing number of codes available for use. In order to free up space for these services, 30 geographic ABC area codes with low number use were condensed into 14 ABC ranges such that each numeric area code would cover multiple charge groups these migration figures do not include the similar area code changes.

Numbers in Barrow-in-Furness already used 2 and 5. Millom used the separate area code. Millom numbers were transferred to the area code. Millom numbers would begin 3 and 7 and have 6 digits. Under the new "ELNS" Extended Linked Numbering Scheme arrangement, two charge groups now share the same area code and the leading digit of the local number indicates which charge group the number belongs to.

The new area code retains both of the old area code names. A diagram showing the principle is shown on page 9 of Oftel's telephone numbering guide [] and these areas are shown in the table below. Calls within the area code do not require the area code to be dialled, this is true even for calls between the charge groups. Of the 16 area codes freed up for alternative use in the s, at least 11 were re-used for other services. For example, the area code was re-allocated to Cellnet mobile services. Five of the area codes remained unused. In , the PhONEday changes for geographic numbers solved the number shortage problem for mobile and non-geographic services by freeing up the whole 07, 08 and 09 range for their use from onwards.

On PhONEday in , became and became and these codes are still in use today. The remainder of the "ELNS" area code allocations and their history are detailed in the table below. The Cellnet mobile allocation stayed in use for about a decade before these numbers were transferred to the range in the Big Number Change in Nowadays all 16 of the area codes freed up in the s albeit now with a 1 prefix, e.

In order to free up space for these services, 17 geographic ABC area codes with low number use were condensed into 6 ABC ranges under a "mixed" scheme. Numbers in Dumfries already used 2 and 5. Numbers in Langholm were 4 or 5 digits long and used the area code. Langholm numbers were changed to 5 digits and transferred to the newly created area code.

Under the new "mixed" arrangement, although and shared the same ABC digits, they were treated as completely separate area codes. All calls from one area to the other require the area code to be dialled. Local numbers in Dumfries cannot begin with a "3". Of the 11 area codes freed up for alternative use in the s, only 5 were actually re-used for other services.

Six of the area codes remained unused. The remainder of the "mixed" area code allocations and their history are detailed in the table below. Nowadays all 11 of the area codes freed up in the s albeit now with a 1 prefix, e. The short number was set aside in March for trials of the new NHS direct service with calls charged at the "local rate".

For example, Isle of Benbecula, Outer Hebrides had been moved to and now started to be re-used for non-geographic services. Oftel had to issue a warning to operators to remove their "this number has changed, please redial inserting a one after the initial zero" messages that had been applied on PhONEday [] so that callers could get through to the new non-geographic numbers.

With the diverse usage and pricing of similar looking codes there could easily be a nasty shock when the bill arrived. Office phone systems could be set to block various premium rate prefixes, but it was important to regularly review and update the list. For those that did not, problems accessing some numbers were beginning to develop. The code was mainly used for premium rate services, but 7xxxxx was used by One2One for mobile telephone services. Some people found that calls to all numbers were barred and hence also those mobile phones.

To overcome this, the 7xxxxx range was mirrored on to 7xxxxx. From onwards, x numbers with 10 digits started coming into use for premium rate services. As with and numbers, certain small number blocks within the x range were set aside for migration of old premium rate codes in the forthcoming Big Number Change. From 23 August , Oftel added the range [] as by then was almost fully allocated. Announced in November [] and issued from February onwards [34] the range was designated "internet for schools". As the number of lines in use continued to grow, some areas became close to full capacity.

In the lates, Ofcom signalled a number of areas of concern. Of these, only Coventry was immediately addressed - by migration to the code and eight digit subscriber numbers in the Big Number Change in The Bournemouth, Aberdeen, Brighton, Bradford and Middlesbrough as well as Milton Keynes, despite not being initially highlighted in the report areas were later addressed in and by requiring digit dialling for local calls see the and local number dialling sections below , as an interim measure until shorter area codes and 8 digit local numbers are introduced.

The x to x range was designated "broadband services". Calls between nearby exchanges could previously be dialled using a "short code", often beginning 7, 8 or 9. With rising demand for more subscriber numbers, these codes were scrapped in the late s. After a short delay, 6-digit subscriber numbers beginning 7 or 8 began to be issued in these 01xxx areas, and with 5-digits in 01xxxx areas.

In the mid- and late s, some of these areas also started issuing subscriber numbers beginning 9. On 22 April the second phase of the plan came into operation, dubbed the "Big Number Change". With 02x area codes freed up by the previous reorganisation, they could be re-used. These areas had already had a code change to insert a "1" five years earlier as a part of PhONEday. The Big Number Change altered the area codes again, as well as making the local number two digits longer London: Although Southampton and Portsmouth are one code from a code structure and local dialling point of view, calls between them are not treated as local calls for pricing purposes.

It is planned that the new codes will eventually cover a larger area than at present. For example, although currently covers just the Cardiff area, it may in the future cover all of Wales. The code for Northern Ireland is The transition codes for Northern Ireland are shown below. These can be accessed from the Republic of Ireland using either the domestic code , or the international prefix 00 44 The prefixes for existing numbers in Northern Ireland are split up into seven groups, roughly based upon the county in which the main exchange is based.

The initial digit of each phone number is based on the designated county—for example, the first county alphabetically is County Antrim so numbers in this county start with 2. The next county is County Armagh so numbers here start with 3. One exception to this is the Greater Belfast area, initial digit 9, which is extended to include each adjacent former STD code area, including the towns of Bangor, County Down 91 , Lisburn 92 , Carrickfergus 93 , Antrim 94 and Saintfield There is a much more complete list in the Big Number Change article.

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In addition, mobile and pager numbers were all moved into the 07xxx range. Pagers moved into xx , while personal numbers moved to Mobile phone numbers moved into the xx , xx and xx ranges and more recently, xx and xx have also been brought into use. The exception to this was Manx Telecom mobile phone numbers, where the code became in order to match the used for landlines. In addition, lower and higher rate non-geographic numbers previously called lo-call or local-rate and national-rate numbers, though these terms are no longer recommended to be used as they can be misleading [36] [37] [38] [39] [40] [41] [42] [43] [44] [45] [46] [47] [48] migrated to 08xx and premium rate numbers migrated to 09xx.

A summary of the migration path for the existing mobile and pager codes, as they were at the time, is shown below:. Existing London numbers acquired the prefixes 7 or 8, but from that point on 7xxx xxxx and 8xxx xxxx numbers were assigned or reused anywhere in the London area covered by the single city-wide code. From June the regulator, Ofcom, ceased to allocate new number blocks to suppliers in the 7xxx xxxx and 8xxx xxxx ranges.


  1. Northern Ireland phone numbers?
  2. Telephone numbers in the Republic of Ireland - Wikipedia.
  3. download khmer unicode for iphone 3gs.

From this date onwards all number allocations were in the 3xxx xxxx range and can be used anywhere in the London area. Although new blocks of 7xxx xxxx and 8xxx xxxx range numbers are no longer being allocated to suppliers, those that have not yet exhausted their existing blocks are able to continue to issue and re-issue them to their customers. Numbers in the 0xxx xxxx and 1xxx xxxx number ranges have also been made available. However, these numbers cannot be dialled without the code and are called "national dialling only" numbers. A small number of these blocks are used by numbers migrated from old xx xxxx, xx xxxx, xx xxxx, and xx xxxx "national dialling only" numbers.

They are mainly used as termination points for non-geographic numbers, and for various alarm and other automated systems where the actual telephone number itself is never called. It is a common misconception that London still has more than one area code i. Therefore, writing a London number as x xxx xxxx is incorrect and can lead to confusion when attempting to dial it. The misconception of area code and number separation is also seen in other areas of the country where the area code length was reduced in the Big Number Change such as Coventry being written as xxxxxx, whereas the correct number sequence is 76xx xxxx Coventry now has some 77xx xxxx and 75xx xxxx numbers and Cardiff being written as xxxxxx whereas the correct number sequence is 20xx xxxx Cardiff now has some 21xx xxxx and 22xx xxxx numbers.

Likewise in Portsmouth, numbers are being incorrectly written as xxxxxx, whereas the correct number sequence is 92xx xxxx Portsmouth now has some 93xx xxxx numbers. This also occurs in some areas of Northern Ireland, that previously had 5-digit and 6-digit local numbers like in Banbridge previously xxxxx , where numbers are still erroneously written as xxxxx instead of x xxxx. Locals still misquote the area code as , even now, some twelve years after the change.

The same occurs in formerly six-digit code areas, such as Lisburn previous xxxxxx continues to frequently appear as xxxxxx instead of the correct form 92xx xxxx. This is also seen in the earlier PhONEday areas, such as in Sheffield, for 2xx xxxx numbers, where these are often seen written as xxxxxx or are missing the leading digit 2 when abbreviated instead of for example.

It also affects Reading numbers where these are still being written as xxxxxx, whereas the correct number sequence is 9xx xxxx. Now that Reading has some 3xx xxxx and 4xx xxxx numbers mis-dialling also occurs when people prefix 3xx xxxx and 4xx xxxx numbers with instead of just In all of these areas, the result of the confusion is that callers are adding an incorrect area code to numbers allocated within the new local number ranges, and that then results in a mis-dialled call. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Main article: Director telephone system.

List of dialling codes in the United Kingdom. All figure dialling. See also: Telephone numbers in the Republic of Ireland. List telephone area name changes in the United Kingdom. This article may primarily relate to a different subject , or place undue weight on a particular aspect rather than the subject as a whole.

Please help by spinning off or relocating any relevant information, and removing excessive detail that may be against Wikipedia's inclusion policy. November This article may lend undue weight to certain ideas, incidents, or controversies. Please help improve it by rewriting it in a balanced fashion that contextualizes different points of view. November Learn how and when to remove this template message. Big Number Change. UK telephone code misconceptions.

Previous to that, these codes were 0xxx with six-figure local numbers, except London and parts of NI.

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London codes were previously 0x1 with seven-figure local numbers. NI codes added a "1" at PhONEday but some areas previously had longer codes than shown, paired with shorter numbers that were often only four or five digits long. BT Group. Archived from the original on 30 October Retrieved 21 January Archived from the original on 23 September Kingston Communications. Archived from the original on 12 November Retrieved 10 October Communicating for Years".

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The Authority told the advertisers not to refer to numbers as 'national rate'. Marketing communications should also state that the price of calls originating from non-BT call providers varies.

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Retrieved 22 February Daily Gazette. Newsquest Essex Ltd. Haymarket Business Media. Archived from the original on 22 May Birmingham Mail. Trinity Mirror Group. Londonderry Sentinel. Johnston Publishing Ltd. Archived from the original on 7 May Archived from the original on 13 August Creation of New Area Code for Ebbsfleet". Archived PDF from the original on 16 July Archived from the original on 25 March Yorkshire Evening Post. Archived from the original PDF on 21 February Archived from the original PDF on 17 February Archived from the original PDF on Ashley Medical Centre.

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